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    1 month, 3 weeks ago
    The walk to the crater passes by many cracks and fissures that opened up during the thousands of earthquakes that rocked the area during the summit collapse of 2018. On a clear day this is an excellent vantage point for viewing the 13,677 foot summit of Mauna Loa and 13,796 foot summit of Mauna Kea.
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    1 month, 3 weeks ago
    Pu‘u = hill Loa = long Pu‘uloa = "Long Hill" Underlying meaning or kaona (hidden meaning) = "Hill of Long Life" Puʻuloa is a very sacred and religious place for many of the people of Hawaiʻi and has been used ritually for over 500 years. It is the largest petroglyph field in the state. There are more then 23,000 petroglyph images, mostly poho (cupules, or depressions) in which a portion of the umbilical cord of a newborn was placed to ensure a long life. Motifs of circles, other geometric designs, as well as cryptic designs of human representations known as anthropomorphisms, canoe sails, and even feathered cape motifs can all be found in this dense concentration. The petroglyphs are accessible via a day hike of 1.5 miles (2.4 km) round trip that begins at the Puʻuloa Petroglyphs trailhead. Pu‘uloa is a "volcanic pressure dome" that was formed during the eruption of Kāne Nui O Hamo about 550 years ago.
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    1 month, 3 weeks ago
    Puʻuhuluhulu is accessible via a short day hike beginning at the Maunaulu parking lot. In reference to its vegetation-covered slopes, Puʻuhuluhulu means “hairy hill” in Hawaiian and stands out in stark contrast to the adjacent lava flows of Maunaulu. The 1969-1974 eruption of Maunaulu was centered just downhill from Puʻuhuluhulu and over the course of five years, surrounded most of this cinder cone. Today the top of the cone features an observation deck that provides a view of the Maunaulu lava shield that formed during the eruption. A Maunaulu Trail Guide is also available (pdf- 7.63 MB) A restroom is available at the Maunaulu parking lot.
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    1 month, 3 weeks ago
    Following the East Rift Zone of Kīlauea, the Nāpau Trail provides opportunities for hikers to experience a diversity of environments in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The hike is through varied terrain ranging from recent lava flows to dense tree fern rain forests. The Nāpau Trail passes through lava flows from the Maunaulu eruptions. Maunaulu (Lit. growing mountain), a recently formed shield volcano, erupted from 1969 through 1974 and left an altered landscape of incredibly fascinating geologic features. Trekking over lava rivers and through lava channels you can appreciate the fragile beauty of lava trees, peer into pit craters, and imagine a time when molten rock once moved like water. Also along the trail is the "Old Pulu Factory." Learn more about these pulu stations from the 1800s. Nāpau may be accessed from two trailheads: The Maunaulu parking area (6.2 mi/10.0 km to Nāpau Crater) The Nāulu Trailhead on Chain of Craters Road (5.2 mi/8.4 km to Nāpau Crater) The Nāpau Trail begins at the Maunaulu parking area (approx. 3.5 miles down the Chain of Craters Road). The Nāulu Trail, which links to the Nāpau Trail, begins across the road at the Kealakomo parking area (approx. 9.7 miles down the Chain of Craters Road). There is a campground and pit toilet near Nāpau Crater overlook. Stays are limited to 3 consecutive nights. GPS Coordinates of Nāpau Crater: 19.37377, -155.14293 Register All eight backcountry campsites (Ka‘aha, Halapē, Keauhou, ‘Āpua Point, Nāpau, Pepeiao, Red Hill Cabin and Mauna Loa Cabin) require a permit. See the Backcountry Hiking page at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park for instructions on how to obtain your permit. Be Prepared Facilities Neither trailhead has public telephones or public transportation. It takes about 20 to 30 minutes to drive from the Kīlauea Visitor Center via Crater Rim Drive and Chain of Craters Road to get to the trailheads. No drinking water is available at the trailheads or anywhere along the Nāpau, Nāulu, and Kalapana Trails. We do not have streams in this area so backpackers must bring in all their own water (recommended: 4 quarts/person/day). The lower end of the historic Kalapana trail has been covered by miles of lava.The upper section of the trail is no longer maintained, densely overgrown and is extremely difficult to follow. DO NOT plan on using this trail. Leave No Trace Hikers are required to pack out everything they pack in. Do not bury or discard trash in pit toilets - Pack it out. Practice "leave no trace" camping
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    1 month, 3 weeks ago
    Begin at the Kīlauea Visitor Center: 5.3 miles (8.5 km) round-trip. Plan for approximately 3 to 4 hours. Walk past the vintage Volcano House to take Crater Rim Trail towards Kūpinaʻi Pali (Waldron Ledge) from Kīlauea Visitor Center to access Kīlauea Iki Trail loop. Connections from the Halemaʻumaʻu Trail near the visitor center are also possible. Descend through a lush rainforest to the solidified lava lake on the floor of Kīlauea Iki crater. Peer into the vent that erupted to a height of 1900 feet during the eruption of 1959 located below Puʻupua‘i cinder cone. After 5 or more switchbacks up (about 20 minutes) you’ll cross the road and loop Nahuku lava tube. You’ll hike down into another smaller collapsed crater and walk through a verdant rainforest and listen for the calls of native birds before entering a 500-year old lava tube where a river of 2000 degree fahrenheit (1093° celsius) lava once flowed. Its Hawaiian name, Nāhuku, means "the protuberances," which possibly refers to the lava drippings that once hung from the ceiling. Unfortunately, those disappeared due to souvenir collectors after the tube was discovered in 1913. Entire ecosystems of creatures live in these fragile environments found throughout the Island of Hawaiʻi. Please be respectful and do not touch the walls or any hanging roots. You’ll recross the road back to the sidewalk and hike to the right up a steep but short paved hill then continue looping Kilauea crater on the left till you see the sign veering right for the Kilauea Visitor Center. One more mile to go. The Volcano House is host to the iconic Uncle George’s bar which overlooks the summit caldera and the lava lake when erupting. Worth stopping to emphasize the memorable adventure.
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    1 month, 3 weeks ago
    This hike descends through a lush rainforest to the solidified lava lake on the floor of Kīlauea Iki crater. Peer into the vent that erupted to a height of 1900 feet during the eruption of 1959 located below Puʻupua‘i cinder cone. Difficulty: Moderate to challenging - Steep and rocky, descent & ascent 400 feet (122 m). Parking: Parking at Kīlauea Iki Overlook is extremely limited. During peak hours, there may be no parking available. If you are interested in a longer hike, you are strongly encouraged to begin your hike at Kīlauea Visitor Center, Devastation Trailhead, or Puʻupuaʻi Parking Area.
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    1 month, 4 weeks ago
    Kilauea Kiki trail down the edge of a crater and across an old lava lake! Spectacular views!
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    7 months ago
    Lol, best hike ever, testing my new app!
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    8 months, 2 weeks ago
    Did this in the dark with headlamps and a strong flood flashlight. Incredible and serene, culminating in a connection to ceremonial carvings made 600+ years ago. Amazing. Watch your step if doing at night! Slow and steady :) oh, and lots of cockroaches
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    1 year, 2 months ago
    A little different and off the beaten path. Out in the Ka’u desert you notice the little things. the changing colour of the lava new ferns growing and a lot of variety. Hiking on pahoehoe sand and over ‘a’a. Views on maunaloa, Maunakea, fault lines up to Jagger museum and down to the coast towards Naalehu. Didn’t see a single person. Well marked trail.
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    1 year, 9 months ago
    This hike was OK. 1.25 miles, no real shade. Had to speed hike and the payoff is Muana Ulu crater which we didn’t make it to. Pu’u Huluhulu was overgrown with vegetation making it difficult to see anything. Coming from volcanoes and lava flows from west coast mainland, was pretty disappointed with Volcano National Park. If no lava is flowing, it’s just a lot of remnants of flowing lava that you see all over the island. There are large, impressive craters and some steam vents. However, if you have more exciting things to do, do them over this. My teenagers couldn’t have cared less (typical around that age) and I felt a little more that way after visiting.
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    2 years, 1 month ago
    A very easy loop starting at the park visitors center. Interesting things to look at and very good views into Kīlauea crater.
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